UNDER DEVELOPMENT

 

HALL OF FAME

(HOF)

Open to all individuals who have made an extraordinary contribution over their professional career, and/or marked by performance leaving a conspicuously positive impact on the Chemical Corps, or who have performed a significant act (heroism) while assigned to a duty position in the Chemical Corps, the Chemical Branch, the Chemical Regiment or service to the Chemical Warfare Service.
 
 2020 Hall of Fame Nomination Instructions
 

2019

LTG Thomas W. Spoehr

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Biography

CSM Patrick Z. Alston

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Biography

2018

SGT Raymond E. Nicoli

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Biography

TEC5 Felice J. Savino

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Biography

PVT Donald B. McLaren

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Biography

PVT Benton L. Porter

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Biography

2017

1LT Andre N. Laus

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Biography

2016

COL Harold C. Kinne, Jr.

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Biography

LTC William J. Cribb, Jr.

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Biography


2015

MG John C. Doesburg

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Biography

LTC Edgar D. Stark

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Biography

2014

BG Stanley H. Lillie

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Biography

BG Patricia L. Nilo

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Biography

CPT Andrew M. Barr

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Biography

2013

MG Stephen V. Reeves

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Biography

SSG Dr. John E. Thiel

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Biography

2012

MG Ralph G. Wooten

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Biography

COL Merritt W. Briggs

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Biography

2011

1LT Sidney Diamond

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Biography

2010

LTC Dean M. Dickey

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Biography

CPT Paul B. Bowman

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Biography

CSM Theodore R. MacDonnell

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Biography

2009

CSM Peter Hiltner

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Biography

PVT Richard Griffin

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Biography

2008

COL Stuart A. Hamilton

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Biography

CPT Frederick Smith

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Biography

Mr. Garrett Morgan

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Biography

2007

Mr. Michael Parker

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Biography

2006

BG James H. Batte

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Biography

COL Julian G. Brunt

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Biography

COL Stanley D. Fair

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Biography

1LT Joseph Terry

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Biography

2005

GEN Anthony C. McAuliffe

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Biography

Dr. Irving Langmuir

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Biography

Mr. James L. Bacon

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Biography

2004

CPT James Panas

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Biography

2003

MG George E. Friel

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Biography

COL Jack Mojecki

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Biography

MAJ Herbert W. Thornton

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Biography

SGM Paul D. Cockman, Jr.

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Biography

Dr. Anna Johnson-Winegar

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Biography

2001

MG Peter G. Olenchuk

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Biography

MG Robert D. Orton

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Biography

BG Peter Hidalgo

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Biography

LTC Charles Kirkwood

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Biography

1999

COL George B. Coe

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Biography

LTC Troy H. Sanders

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Biography

PVT Edward C. Carter

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Biography

1997

GEN John Pershing

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Biography

COL Walton A. Phillips

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Biography

SGM Donald E. Brinkley

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Biography

Mr. Thomas F. Carroll

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Biography

1996

BG Fred Joseph Delmore

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Biography

Mr. Michell Modrall

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Biography

1995

MG Alan A. Nord

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Biography

COL Carl V. Burke

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Biography

COL George P. Unmacht

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Biography

Mr. Randolph Monro

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Biography

1994

MG James R. Klugh

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Biography

MG Gerald G. Watson

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Biography

COL Billy G. Cook

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Biography

CSM George L. Murray

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Biography

1993

MG David W. Einsel, Jr.

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Biography

COL Edwin M. Chance

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Biography

COL Garland M. White

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Biography

Ms. Elsie Fisher

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Biography

1992

COL Joaquin E. Zanetti

Colonel Joaquin Enrique Zanetti

Colonel Joaquin Enrique Zanetti was born in the Dominican Republic on January 20th, 1885. He received his PhD in chemistry from Harvard University in 1909 and then began a distinguished teaching career at Columbia University leading to his appointment as full professor in 1929 and professor emeritus in 1953.

During World War I he was a lieutenant colonel in the Chemical Warfare Service. In the interwar years he served as a Chemical Officer in the reserves and was a consulting expert for the League of Nations on chemical warfare.

A pioneer in incendiary warfare in the 1930s, he was called to active duty in 1941 to take charge of the critically important incendiary bomb program.

Mr. Edwin R. Bradley

Mr. Edward R. Bradley

Mr. Edward R. Bradley was born in Greeneville, Texas, on March 4, 1931. He received his Bachelor of Science in physics in 1958, followed by his Master of Science from East Texas University in 1960.

He then joined the Chemical School as Chief of the Radiology Laboratory, a position he held at Fort McClellan, Alabama, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, then again at Fort McClellan, until his untimely death in 1982.

Ms. Amoretta M. Hoeber

Ms. Amoretta M. Hoeber

Ms. Amoretta M. Hoeber was born in Austin, Texas, on November 14, 1941. After receiving her AB in political science from Stanford University she did graduate work in mathematics and operations research there, at UCLA and American University.

Ms. Hoeber has written widely on chemical and nuclear warfare and has been a consistent and staunch supporter of the Chemical Corps. She has held a number of senior positions including Presidential appointments in the Department of the Army from 1981 to 1986.

Ms. Hoeber was a key spokesperson for the Army in obtaining approval from Congress for the chemical binary munitions program. She also orchestrated the billion dollar program for the destruction of obsolete chemical weapons.

1991

MG William Marshall Stubbs

Major General W. Marshall Stubbs

Major General W. Marshall Stubbs was born in Nebraska in 1906. After graduating from the United States Military academy in 1929, he served with the Infantry for four years, transferring to the Chemical Warfare Service in 1934.

He served as a senior Chemical Officer in the European Theater during World War II. After the war he commanded the Chemical Corps Materiel Command and the 1st Logistical Command.

His distinguished service with the Chemical Corps culminated with his assignment as Chief Chemical Officer from 1958 to 1963. General Stubbs many decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Ordre de Leopold with Palm from Belgium and Croix de Guerre with Palm from France.

General Stubbs died 20 November 1990.

BG A.M. Prentiss

Brigadier General Augustin M. Prentiss

Brigadier General Augustin M. Prentiss was born in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 1890. He received his Bachelor of Science from the George Washington University in 1911 and then served with the Chemical Warfare Service in France during World War I.

He remained in the Chemical Warfare Service after the war and received his PhD from the George Washington University in 1923. His assignments after then included that of Technical Director of Edgewood Arsenal and command of Pine Bluff Arsenal throughout World War II.

Brigadier General Prentiss authored many books and articles, including Chemicals in War; A Treatise on Chemical Warfare, still widely consulted.

His many decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the U.S. Legion of Honor and the French Legion of Honor.

COL William H. Walker

Colonel William H. Walker

Colonel William H. Walker was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1869. He received his Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Pennsylvania State College in 1890 and a PhD from the University of Gottingen in 1892.

A professor of chemical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology before World War I, his expertise led to his appointment as first Assistant Director of the War Department Gas Service, forerunner of the Chemical Warfare Service, in 1916.

He later directed research in Chemical Warfare at American University and became the first commander of Edgewood Arsenal. After the war, Colonel Walker returned to teaching but maintained a keen interest in the Chemical Warfare Service until his death on 9 July 1934.

Colonel Walker’s numerous awards include the Distinguished Service Medal and the American Chemical Society Nichols Gold Medal.

CPL Robert B. MacMullin

Corporal Robert B. MacMullin

Corporal Robert Burns MacMullin was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1898. He served with the First Gas Regiment in France during World War I and was an ardent supporter of the Chemical Warfare Service and Chemical Corps.

He was active in the First Gas Regiment Association and was editor of their newsletter the “Gas Attack” for many years. After World War I, Corporal MacMullin received a degree in chemical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and went on to a distinguished career in chemical engineering.

Corporal MacMullin holds over 50 patents, he published widely in professional journals and he authored chapters in several textbooks and encyclopedias.

Among his awards are the 1982 Award for Chemical Engineering Practice from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Schoellkopf Medal and the Perkin Medal.

Dr. Bernard Berger

Dr. Bernard Berger

Dr. Bernard Berger retired from the position of Director of Weapons Systems at the United States Army Chemical Research and Development Laboratories in 1980 after over 37 years of service to the Chemical Corps.

During his distinguished career he contributed to numerous chemical warfare developments and authored a large number of technical and scientific articles published by national laboratories and professional journals. Because of his reputation he was selected to represent the United States in the NATO Group on Defense against Chemical Warfare. He also chaired the Tripartite Flame Conference and actively participated in the French-American Defense Technical Cooperation Exchange Program.

Dr. Berger’s numerous awards included the William H. Walker award, the Legion d’Honneur from the French Government, two Meritorious Civilian Service Medals and the Commendation for Meritorious Civilian Service during World War II.

Dr. Berger died 23 February 1981.

1990

MG John G. Appel

Major General John G. Appel

Major General John G. Appel graduated from Rose Polytechnic Institute, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, in 1941 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering. He received a commission as Second Lieutenant in the Chemical Warfare Service Reserve and entered active duty on 7 July 1941.

Among his assignments were Commanding Officer of the U.S. Army Chemical Procurement District in New York City; Chief, Plans and Policy Division, CBR and Nuclear Operations Directorate, and then the Deputy Director, CBR and Nuclear Operations Directorate in the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff; Director of Plans, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics at the Pentagon; Senior Serving Chemical Officer (1972-1974) and Director of Logistics, J-4 in Germany at the Headquarters, U.S. European Command.

His awards include: The Legion of Merit (2 Oak leaf clusters), the Army Commendation Medal with one oak leaf cluster.

MG Egbert F. Bullene

Major General Egbert F. Bullene

Major General Egbert F. Bullene entered the Army in 1917 after graduation from the Naval Academy. He served as an artillery officer in France in World War I and subsequently joined the Chemical Warfare Service.

During World War II he was promoted to Brigadier General and served as Commander of the Chemical Troops Training Center, Chemical Officer for the Armored Forces, and Commanding General of the San Jose project.

He also served in both the European and Pacific theaters of operation. After the war he commanded the Army Chemical Center and served as the Chief Chemical Officer of the Army. General Bullene’s decorations included the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star Medal, and the Purple Heart.

General Bullene died on 21 February 1958.

MG William N. Porter

Major General William N. Porter

Major General William N. Porter graduated from the Naval Academy in 1909. He served with the Navy and the Army Coast Artillery Corps and then transferred to the Chemical Warfare Service 1921.

Shortly before Pearl Harbor, General Porter became Chief of the Chemical Warfare Service, a position he held throughout the war. Under his leadership, the Army’s chemical defensive and offensive capabilities deterred use of chemical weapons by the Axis Powers.

The Chemical Warfare Service also made significant contributions to victory through the use of the 4.2 inch chemical mortar with smoke, incendiary bombs and high explosives and mechanized flame throwers. After retirement in 1945, General Porter held important positions with industry.

Among his many awards were the Distinguished Service Medal, the Order of Leopold from the Belgian Government, and Award of Commander, Order of the British Empire.

General Porter died in Key West, Florida, in February 1973.

COL Lewis M. McBride

Colonel Lewis M. McBride

Colonel Lewis M. McBride was born in Iowa in 1879. After service with the Colorado National Guard, he was commissioned as a Captain in the Corps of Engineers in 1918. In 1920 he transferred to the Chemical Warfare Service where he served until his retirement in 1944.

Colonel McBride, the “Father of the 4.2” mortar,” experimented successfully with new methods of filling and sealing liquids in shells. He held several patents, but his greatest contribution was the 4.2 inch mortar. He successfully rifled the 4 inch Stokes mortar to increase range and accuracy. The new mortar was to play a key role in World War II and Korea.

Colonel McBride retired twice from the Army. The first time was in 1942. This retirement was short lived as he was recalled to active duty shortly thereafter, serving with distinction until his permanent retirement in 1944.

Colonel McBride died June 1956.

Dr. Bernard P. McNamara

Dr. Bernard P. McNamara

Dr. Bernard P. McNamara devoted a professional career of almost 40 years to the Chemical Corps. Beginning as a junior pharmacologist at Edgewood Arsenal in 1942, he culminated his career in the senior executive service as Chief of the Toxicology Division at the Chemical Research and Development Laboratories.

A pioneer in his field, Dr. McNamara wrote over 150 technical publications. In addition to his work with the Army, he was an advisor to the Environmental Protection Agency and a very active participant in professional activities. His vast expertise led to service on the Committee on Disarmament, the National Research Council, and the National Cancer Institute.

His numerous awards included the William H. Walker Award, the Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award, and the National Civil Service League Career Service Award.

Dr. McNamara died in 1980.

1989

MG William N. Creasy

Major General William N. Creasy

Major General William N. Creasy served as the Chief of Chemical Officer and Commanding General of the Army Chemical Center from 1951 until 1958. During this service, he directed the U.S. Army’s development of a modernized chemical warfare capability through nerve agent standardization and new production methods and facilities.

MG Creasy faced serious threats to disestablish the Chemical Corps since chemical weapons had not been used in the last two wars and because of increasing popular distaste for chemical warfare. As he successfully defended the Chemical Corps, he not only modernized its offensive and defensive capabilities, but he also modernized its research and management.

He strengthened the bond between the civilian industrial base and the Corps, streamlined its command structure, and implemented progressive means of production, research, and training.

MG Amos A. Fries

Major General Amos A. Fries

Major General Amos A. Fries served as the first chief of the Gas Service, American Expeditionary Force in World War I, from September 1917 until the Armistice in November 1918. Then Colonel Fries was responsible for organizing, equipping, and training the major overseas command of the American chemical warfare effort.

After the Armistice, MG Fries was instrumental in establishing the Chemical Warfare Service (CWS) as a permanent part of the Regular Army in 1920. He then became its second chief and served there for the next nine years.

MG Fries faced and overcame serious attempts to abolish the combat mission of the CWS because of the growing distaste for chemical warfare and the natural reduction of the Army to its peacetime level. His tireless work set the pattern for the future of the CWS and assured its place in the United States Army.

MG John J. Hayes

Major General John J. Hayes

Major General John J. Hayes, as commander of the Second Logistics Command, planned and executed Operation Red Hat, the flawless movement of more than 10,000 tons of toxic chemical munitions from Okinawa to Johnston Island in 1970 and 1971.

He was personally responsible for the extremely sensitive planning and coordination of the movement from Okinawa and for the identification and preparation of another storage site. The movement required construction of storage facilities on Johnston Island, identifying numerous routes for the movement, training personnel, and coordinating among the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard, and civilian agencies.

His understanding of and concern for the political and public issues enabled him to solve countless problems arising from adverse public opinion and often heated national opposition.

MG William L. Sibert

Major General William L. Sibert

Major General William L. Sibert was the first Chief of the Chemical Warfare Service (CWS) from 1918 until 1920. In June of 1918, he brought his extensive experience in organizing and conducting complex engineering projects to bear on the chaotic American effort in gas warfare.

He consolidated the work of the Medical, Ordnance, Signal and Engineer Corps and the U.S. Bureau of Mines into one agency. The result, the CWS, had an authorized strength of 4,060 officers and 44,615 enlisted men.

MG Sibert directed the total American effort in research and development in chemical munitions and in the standardization of doctrine, materiel, and training. His effort welded together the great U.S. Chemical Warfare Machine, ensured unity of effort, and brought the CWS to maturity as a permanent, separate branch of the United States Army.

COL Earl J. Atkisson

Colonel Earl J. Atkisson

Colonel Earl J. Atkisson organized, trained, and commanded the First Gas Regiment from August 1917 until March 1919. As a captain, Atkisson was tasked to raise the 30th Engineer Regiment (Gas and Flame). In ten months he recruited all officers and enlisted men, equipped and trained the Regiment, and deployed to France.

In August of 1918, the 30th Engineers was redesignated the First Gas Regiment of the American Gas Service. In spite of Allied experience in the First World War, COL Atkisson had to first convince skeptical American field commanders of the value of offensive gas operations.

He was so effective that eventually, in a five month period (17 July to 11 November 1918), the Regiment participated in 133 separate actions using poison gases, smoke, and high explosives.

For his exceptional command, COL Atkisson was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOF

(Alphabetical Order)

• CSM Patrick Z. Alston (2019)

MG John G. Appel (1990)

COL Earl J. Atkisson (1989)

• Mr. James L. Bacon (2005)

• CPT Andrew M. Barr (2014)

• BG James H. Batte (2006)

Dr. Bernard Berger (1991)

• CPT Paul B. Bowman (2010)

Mr. Edwin R. Bradley (1992)

• COL Merritt W. Briggs (2012)

• SGM Donald E. Brinkley (1997)

• COL Julian G. Brunt (2006)

MG Egbert F. Bullene (1990)

• COL Carl V. Burke (1995)

• Mr. Thomas F. Carroll (1997)

• PVT Edward C. Carter (1999)

• COL Edwin M. Chance (1993)

• SGM Paul D. Cockman, Jr. (2003)

• COL George B. Coe (1999)

• COL Billy G. Cook (1994)

MG William N. Creasy (1989)

• LTC William J. Cribb, Jr. (2016)

• BG Fred Joseph Delmore (1996)

• 1LT Sidney Diamond (2011)

• LTC Dean M. Dickey (2010)

• MG John C. Doesburg (2015)

• MG David W. Einsel, Jr. (1993)

• COL Stanley D. Fair (2006)

• Ms. Elsie Fisher (1993)

• MG George E. Friel (2003)

MG Amos A. Fries (1989)

• PVT Richard Griffin (2009)

• COL Stuart A. Hamilton (2008)

MG John J. Hayes (1989)

• BG Peter Hidalgo (2001)

• CSM Peter Hiltner (2009)

Ms. Amoretta M. Hoeber (1992)

• Dr. Anna Johnson-Winegar (2003)

• COL Harold C. Kinne, Jr. (2016)

• LTC Charles Kirkwood (2001)

• MG James R. Klugh (1994)

• Dr. Irving Langmuir (2005)

• 1LT Andre N. Laus (2017)

• BG Stanley H. Lillie (2014)

• CSM Theodore R. MacDonnell (2010)

CPL Robert B. MacMullin (1991)

• GEN Anthony C. McAuliffe (2005)

COL Lewis M. McBride (1990)

• PVT Donald B. McLaren (2018)

Dr. Bernard P. McNamara (1990)

• Mr. Michell Modrall (1996)

• COL Jack Mojecki (2003)

• Mr. Randolph Monro (1995)

• Mr. Garrett Morgan (2008)

• CSM George L. Murray (1994)

• SGT Raymond E. Nicoli (2018)

• BG Patricia L. Nilo (2014)

• MG Alan A. Nord (1995)

• MG Peter G. Olenchuk (2001)

• MG Robert D. Orton (2001)

• CPT James Panas (2004)

• Mr. Michael Parker (2007)

• GEN John Pershing (1997)

• COL Walton A. Phillips (1997)

MG William N. Porter (1990)

• PVT Benton L. Porter (2018)

BG A.M. Prentiss (1991)

• MG Stephen V. Reeves (2013)

• LTC Troy H. Sanders (1999)

• TEC5 Felice J. Savino (2018)

MG William L. Sibert (1989)

• CPT Frederick Smith (2008)

• LTG Thomas W. Spoehr (2019)

• LTC Edgar D. Stark (2015)

MG William Marshall Stubbs (1991)

• 1LT Joseph Terry (2006)

• SSG Dr. John E. Thiel (2013)

• MAJ Herbert W. Thornton (2003)

• COL George P. Unmacht (1995)

COL William H. Walker (1991)

• MG Gerald G. Watson (1994)

• COL Garland M. White (1993)

• MG Ralph G. Wooten (2012)

COL Joaquin E. Zanetti (1992)