UNDER DEVELOPMENT

 

HALL OF FAME

(HOF)

Open to all individuals who have made an extraordinary contribution over their professional career, and/or marked by performance leaving a conspicuously positive impact on the Chemical Corps, or who have performed a significant act (heroism) while assigned to a duty position in the Chemical Corps, the Chemical Branch, the Chemical Regiment or service to the Chemical Warfare Service.
 
 2020 Hall of Fame Nomination Instructions
 

2020

COL Harry D. Tyson

Colonel Harry D. Tyson

Colonel Harry D. Tyson was born in Liverpool, England in 1897. He immigrated to the United States in 1910 and was drafted into the Army in 1918.

Colonel Tyson served in CO F, 1st Gas Regiment and was wounded during the Meuse Argonne offensive. Known as an expert in chemical preparedness, Colonel Tyson spent the interwar years as an Army Reserve officer speaking, writing and working with the Allied Chemical Company in Birmingham, Alabama.

Becoming a naturalized citizen in 1937, Colonel Tyson was placed on active duty in 1940 as Assistant Chemical Officer for the 1st Armored Division, eventually rising to the role of Division Chemical Officer.

During the Battle of Anzio, Colonel Tyson invented the MIC-LIC, a mine clearing charge that significantly reduced casualties. Ironically, Colonel Tyson was wounded during testing of the MIC-LIC. He also developed a smoke launching system for American tanks and during his retirement developed Fragmacord, in which he signed over his patent rights without payment or royalty.

Colonel Tyson would be awarded the Legion of Merit and Purple Heart with Oak Leaf. In retirement, Colonel Tyson became famous for his hand tied flies for saltwater fishing and obtained a patent for a propane filtration system.

Colonel Tyson passed away 01 August 1986 at the age of 88.

2019

LTG Thomas W. Spoehr

Lieutenant General Thomas W. Spoehr

Thomas W. Spoehr served for over 36 years in the U.S. Army, attaining the rank of Lieutenant General. He is an expert on national defense policy and strategy, and has testified before the U.S. Congress on defense strategy, budgets and equipment modernization.

Lieutenant General Spoehr’s articles and commentary have been published widely in both civilian and military media and he is often called upon to provide expert commentary and analysis.

His early military service included operational assignments ensuring Army and joint forces were proficient in countering Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) which consists of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons.

As one of the Army’s foremost unformed experts in this area, Lieutenant General Spoehr, served as the Commandant of the U.S. Army CBRN School, with the responsibility for the policy, training and strategy for this critical area.

Lieutenant General (Retired) Spoehr serves as director of Heritage’s Center for National Defense where he is responsible for supervising research on matters involving U.S. National Defense.

CSM Patrick Z. Alston

Command Sergeant Major Patrick Z. Alston

Command Sergeant Major Patrick Z. Alston began his career in the U.S. Army as a Medical Specialist and reclassified into the U.S. Army Chemical Corps.

He held many key positions in the Chemical Corps to include Drill Sergeant, Noncommissioned Officer in Charge of the Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Detachment for the White House under the Clinton Administration, Lead Instructor for the U.S. Army School Contingency On-site Inspection Training Department, Branch Manager at Human Resource Command and the Acting Command Sergeant Major for the Technical Escort Unit.

Upon being promoted to Sergeant Major, he was assigned to the 23rd Chemical Battalion in Korea. He went on to serve as Brigade Command Sergeant Major for the 23rd Support Command and then was selected to become the 10th Regimental Command Sergeant Major of the U.S. Army CBRN School.

Command Sergeant Major Alston then served as the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Senior Enlisted Leader. His final assignment was as the Senior Enlisted Leader for the United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM), making him the first CBRN Sergeant Major ever selected to serve at the Four Star Level.

Patrick Z. Alston is a Senior Fellow for the National Defense University’s Capstone and Keystone programs. He is also a Senior Consultant with Burlington Capital Corporation, a diverse investment management firm.

2018

SGT Raymond E. Nicoli

Sergeant Raymond E. Nicoli

On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 81st Chemical Battalion (Motorized), was among the first waves to land on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France, spearheading the Liberation of Europe from Nazi control.

The 81st’s primary mission was to use their 4.2-inch chemical mortars to provide fire support to attacking infantry. The 4.2-inch mortar, and the cart on which it was transported, weighed a total of nearly 500 pounds, with each high explosive shell weighing an additional 26 pounds.

The 81st was tasked to provide fire support for the 29th Infantry Division until that division’s artillery could be landed the following day.

Four members, SGT Raymond E. Nicoli, Tech 5 Felice J. Savino, PVT Donald B. McLaren and PVT Benton L. Porter, of D Company would be recognized for exceptional heroism for their actions that day, when their landing craft was hit by enemy fire and sank just short of the beach.

All four would be wounded, but would ignore their wounds in order to make repeated trips to their submerged landing craft, attaching inflatable life belts to their mortar and ammunition carts, in order to float them ashore and put them into action.

Tech 5 Felice J. Savino

Tech 5 Felice J. Savino

On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 81st Chemical Battalion (Motorized), was among the first waves to land on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France, spearheading the Liberation of Europe from Nazi control.

The 81st’s primary mission was to use their 4.2-inch chemical mortars to provide fire support to attacking infantry. The 4.2-inch mortar, and the cart on which it was transported, weighed a total of nearly 500 pounds, with each high explosive shell weighing an additional 26 pounds.

The 81st was tasked to provide fire support for the 29th Infantry Division until that division’s artillery could be landed the following day.

Four members, Tech 5 Felice J. Savino, SGT Raymond E. Nicoli, PVT Donald B. McLaren and PVT Benton L. Porter, of D Company would be recognized for exceptional heroism for their actions that day, when their landing craft was hit by enemy fire and sank just short of the beach.

All four would be wounded, but would ignore their wounds in order to make repeated trips to their submerged landing craft, attaching inflatable life belts to their mortar and ammunition carts, in order to float them ashore and put them into action.

PVT Donald B. McLaren

Private Donald B. McLaren

On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 81st Chemical Battalion (Motorized), was among the first waves to land on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France, spearheading the Liberation of Europe from Nazi control.

The 81st’s primary mission was to use their 4.2-inch chemical mortars to provide fire support to attacking infantry. The 4.2-inch mortar, and the cart on which it was transported, weighed a total of nearly 500 pounds, with each high explosive shell weighing an additional 26 pounds.

The 81st was tasked to provide fire support for the 29th Infantry Division until that division’s artillery could be landed the following day.

Four members, PVT Donald B. McLaren, Tech 5 Felice J. Savino, SGT Raymond E. Nicoli and PVT Benton L. Porter, of D Company would be recognized for exceptional heroism for their actions that day, when their landing craft was hit by enemy fire and sank just short of the beach.

All four would be wounded, but would ignore their wounds in order to make repeated trips to their submerged landing craft, attaching inflatable life belts to their mortar and ammunition carts, in order to float them ashore and put them into action.

PVT Benton L. Porter

Private Benton L. Porter

On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 81st Chemical Battalion (Motorized), was among the first waves to land on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France, spearheading the Liberation of Europe from Nazi control.

The 81st’s primary mission was to use their 4.2-inch chemical mortars to provide fire support to attacking infantry. The 4.2-inch mortar, and the cart on which it was transported, weighed a total of nearly 500 pounds, with each high explosive shell weighing an additional 26 pounds.

The 81st was tasked to provide fire support for the 29th Infantry Division until that division’s artillery could be landed the following day.

Four members, PVT Benton L. Porter, PVT Donald B. McLaren, Tech 5 Felice J. Savino and SGT Raymond E. Nicoli, of D Company would be recognized for exceptional heroism for their actions that day, when their landing craft was hit by enemy fire and sank just short of the beach.

All four would be wounded, but would ignore their wounds in order to make repeated trips to their submerged landing craft, attaching inflatable life belts to their mortar and ammunition carts, in order to float them ashore and put them into action.

2017

1LT Andre N. Laus

First Lieutenant Andre N. Laus

Andre Nichole Laus was born in Paris, France in 1915. He graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1937 with a chemistry degree, and worked as a chemist in Boston, Massachusetts.

Commissioned in the Chemical Warfare Service with the 83rd Chemical Mortar Battalion, on 10 July 1943, he was awarded the Silver Star: When the landing craft holding his company was grounded in deep water and heavy surf and was being subjected to intense enemy machine gun and coast-artillery fire, 1LT Laus swam ashore to determine the depth of water and beach conditions. While guiding his men ashore, he saved a drowning Soldier’s life.

On 29 August 1944, he was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross: When attacked by a superior enemy force, 1LT Laus climbed through intense machine gun fire to an exposed position from which he directed mortar fire on the enemy troops, halting their advance. He obtained a light machine gun and crawled back to his observation post where, despite intense fire, raking machine gun and mortar fire, he succeeded in destroying twenty of the hostile force. When enemy fire finally hit his ammunition belt causing a jam in the gun, he seized a rifle and inflicted substantial casualties among the advancing enemy. Forced to withdraw under heavy machine gun fire, 1LT Laus volunteered to make the initial advance to determine the safety of the road where he was killed by enemy machine gun fire.

His heroic sacrifice and courageous leadership served as a lasting impression to his men and reflects the finest traditions of the Armed Forces of the United States.

2016

COL Harold C. Kinne, Jr.

Colonel Harold C. Kinne, Jr.

Colonel Harold C. Kinne, Jr. was born 28 December 1924 in Pawtucket, Rhode Island and enlisted in the Army in 1943; after attending Officer Candidate School with the Tank Destroyer Branch, he transferred first to the Infantry and then to the Chemical Crops in 1949.

Colonel Kinne served on the Manhattan Project as a Nuclear Effects Engineer. During the Vietnam War he served as the U.S. Chemical Corps Research and Development Command Chief, Chemical Operations Division, Military Assistance Command Vietnam - Headquarters, including specific staff supervision over chemical operations throughout Southeast Asia. He also served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Colonel Kinne held a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Brown University, Master of Science in Physics from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, a Master of Business Administration from George Washington University and Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Texas, Dallas.

His awards include the Bronze Star, Aircraft Crewman Badge, Combat Infantry Badge, Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, World War II Victory Medal, United Nations Service Medal (Korea) and Vietnam Service Medal.

Colonel (Retired) Kinne passed away in March of 2016.

LTC William J. Cribb, Jr.

Lieutenant Colonel William J. Cribb, Jr.

Lieutenant Colonel William J. Cribb, Jr. enlisted in 1942 in the Chemical Warfare Service; commissioned second lieutenant following officer candidate school.

Lieutenant Colonel Cribb served with the 5th CM Mortar Company and the 109th CM Processing Company. As part of the occupation forces in Japan, he served as platoon leader, executive officer and Company Commander 82nd CM Mortar BN.

In 1950, it was mandatory that Chemical Corps officers serve one year in a combat arms branch. With the 29th IN, in Korea, Lieutenant Colonel Cribb led his unit to a vantage point where they could effectively fire on the enemy divert fire and cover the withdrawal of the harassed company. He maintained this position so that some 300 men could extricate themselves from the hazardous position.

Less than a month later, Lieutenant Colonel Cribb again displayed gallantry as he skillfully adjusted mortar fire and was instrumental in wiping out two hostile mortar positions. He served the remainder of his career with the Chemical Corps, his last assignment was Instructor, Assistant Chief and Chief of the Department of Military Science and Tactics, Fort McClellan, Alabama.

His awards include the Silver Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star and Purple Heart with 7 Oak Leaf Clusters. He obtained a Bachelor of Science and Masters in Industrial Management from the University of Maryland.

Lieutenant Colonel Cribb retired from the Chemical Corps in 1964 and passed away in 1973.

2015

MG John C. Doesburg

Major General John C. Doesburg

Major General John C. Doesburg had a long and illustrious military career. After receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from the University of Oklahoma Second Lieutenant Doesburg entered the Army in 1970 through the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) college program. He later received his Master of Military Arts and Science degree from the United States Army Command and General Staff College and graduated from the Army War College.

His last active duty assignment was as Commanding General, United States Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Prior to this he was Commanding General, United State Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command.

In 2010, Major General (Retired) Doesburg became the Honorary Colonel of the Regiment. He now serves as a member of the Strategic Advisory Group for the Global Security Directorate. He is also an Adjunct Faculty member of the Howard Baker Center for Public Policy at the University of Tennessee.

His awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster and Defense Meritorious Service Medal.

In 2007, Major General (Retired) Doesburg was inducted as a Distinguished Member of the Corps.

LTC Edgar D. Stark

Lieutenant Colonel Edgar D. Stark

Lieutenant Colonel Edgar D. Stark was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1927 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant of Infantry.

He transferred to the Chemical Warfare Service in 1939, and took command of the newly-activated 3rd Chemical Battalion in 1942. The Battalion received accolades from the divisions it supported through their on-call, supporting fire.

With the invasion of mainland Italy, the 3rd Battalion received a new mission: to provide close-fire support for the 2nd Division of Moroccan Infantry, part of the French Expeditionary Corps attached to the American 5th Army. Near Cerasuolo, Italy on 12 January 1944, Lieutenant Colonel Stark met with his five company commanders to coordinate efforts of fire support for a Moroccan attack on a vital enemy position; the position was bombed by German aircraft, and Lieutenant Colonel Stark was killed.

Lieutenant Colonel Stark received the Silver Star, Purple Heart and the French Croix de Guerre with Vermeil Star. The importance of Lieutenant Colonel Stark’s leadership and service to the present-day Soldiers of the 3rd Chemical Battalion, cannot be overstated.

Lieutenant Colonel Stark’s dedication to the training and well-being of his Soldiers, and his personal courage in combat are sterling examples of what the 3rd Chemical Brigade instills through values-based training every day.

2014

BG Stanley H. Lillie

Brigadier General Stanley H. Lillie

Brigadier General Stanley H. Lillie, native of Nashville, Tennessee, was commissioned into the Chemical Corps, where he demonstrated remarkable leadership and vision throughout his 30 years of service. He holds a Master of Science degree in National Resources Studies.

Among Brigadier General Lillie’s key appointments was Commander of the 83rd Ordnance Battalion and Akizuki Army Ammunition Depot; Commander of the United States Army Environmental Center; Chief, Biological and Chemical Defense Division, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-8.

Brigadier General Lillie served ad Commandant of the U.S. Army Chemical School and the 23rd Chief of Chemical. In this capacity, he spearheaded efforts to reacquire proponency for Technical Escort training, secured funding for the First Lieutenant Joseph Terry Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Responder Training Facility and began the process of developing a Warrant Officer Program for the Chemical Corps by commissioning the recommending study.

In 2007, Brigadier General (Retired) Lillie founded S.H. Lillie Associates, LLC a consulting company for CBRN defense issues.

Brigadier General Lillie’s awards include the Military Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Distinguished Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (3rd Award), Meritorious Service Medal (4th Award) and the Humanitarian Service Medal.

BG Patricia L. Nilo

Brigadier General Patricia L. Nilo

Brigadier General Patricia L. Nilo was born in Medford, Massachusetts. She entered the military in 1974 through a direct commission as First Lieutenant in the Women’s Army Corps. Detailed to the Ordnance Corps as a chemical specialist, she branch transferred to the Chemical Corps in 1977.

Among her major assignments were Commander 84th Chemical Battalion; Commander, Pine Bluff Arsenal; and Chief, Chemical and NBC Defense Division, Force Development Directorate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans, U.S Army, Washington, D.C.

In 1999, Brigadier General Nilo became the Commandant of the U.S. Army Chemical School and 22nd Chief of Chemical. Under her direction, the Chemical Corps institutionalized the training for the Civil Support Teams and Reserve Component units tasked to provide consequence management support to civilian authorities. In this, she set the foundation for the construction and institutionalization of the present First Lieutenant Joseph Terry Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Responder Facility.

Brigadier General Nilo has been a strong advocate of the woman’s role in the Chemical Corps, having been commissioned as its first female general officer.

Brigadier General (Retired) Nilo’s awards include the Legion of Merit (3rd Award), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (5th Award) and Joint Chiefs of Staff and Army Staff Identification Badges.

CPT Andrew M. Barr

Captain Andrew M. Barr

Captain Andrew M. Barr was born in Greenville, South Carolina, on 7 November, 1928. He enlisted in 1946, and was accepted for Officer Candidate School. Upon graduation, he chose to become a Chemical Corps officer, as it would afford him the opportunity for additional schooling.

As a Platoon Leader and Forward Observer for Charlie Company, 2nd Chemical Mortar Battalion, Captain Barr found himself in Korea on Thanksgiving Day, 1950, surrounded by Communist Chinese Forces. Determined to continue to defend his position, he exposed himself to heavy mortar, small arms and machine gun fire to encourage his men set up a .50 caliber M2 machine gun that delivered devastating fire on the enemy, and with three men held the position to allow the rest of the company, with all their wounded, to withdraw, an act for which he received the Silver Star award.

In February 1951, Captain Barr called fire for over 32 continuous hours to thwart a division-size Chinese attack, for which he received the Bronze Star award. On 24 April 1951, under fire in another Chinese mass attack, he supervised the evacuation of another platoon position. Then, alone, he went to the abandoned position of another platoon, and disabled their mortars to prevent them from being used by the enemy. Later, leading a group of Soldiers, he attempted to remove another platoon’s abandoned equipment, but was ambushed. Captain Barr killed two of the enemy, wounded another, rescued two wounded British Soldiers and withdrew his force without loss, receiving his second Silver Star award.

2013

MG Stephen V. Reeves

Major General Stephen V. Reeves

Major General Stephen V. Reeves was born in Topeka, Kansas. He received a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from the University of Kansas as the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Distinguished Military Graduate, a Master’s in Business Administration from Central Michigan University and a Master’s in National Security Strategic Studies from Syracuse University. His military education includes the Defense Acquisition University and the Eisenhower School for National Security and Resource Strategy in which he was the Distinguished Honor Graduate.

In over a decade as the Chemical Corps principle materiel developer, Major General Reeves developed and fielded over 100 new systems, vaccines, pharmaceuticals and medical devices for the U.S. Army Chemical Corps. He established and for seven years led the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense. His publications in major armed forces journals promote the need to fund and support Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear defense.

Major General Reeve’s awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit 3rd Award, U.S. Vice President Hammer Award for Innovation in Defense Contracting and two time recipient of the Department of Defense David Packard Award for Acquisition Excellence, JPO Biological Defense, JPEO Chemical and Biological Defense.

Major General Reeves currently is a Strategic Consultant and resides in Virginia.

SSG Dr. John E. Thiel

Staff Sergeant John E. Thiel

Staff Sergeant John E. Thiel was born in Davenport, Iowa. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1967 and completed the Chemical Staff Specialist Course as the honor graduate. He served two tours in Vietnam with the 26th Chemical Detachment and the 184th Chemical Platoon of the 1st Cavalry Division Airmobile. Having been severely wounded during both tours, he was medically retired from the U.S. Army at the rank of Staff Sergeant in 1971.

Staff Sergeant Thiel’s military awards include the Bronze Star, Purple Heart with two oak leaf clusters, Air Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal with Silver Star and the Honorable Order of the Dragon.

Utilizing the Veterans Administration Vocational Rehabilitation Program, Staff Sergeant Thiel earned his Bachelor of Science (Magna Cum Laude) in 1974, Master of Business Administration in 1976 and became a Doctor of Business Administration in 1978. Dr. Thiel went on to teach at Indiana University, University of Tennessee and Butler and Indiana State University.

Today, Dr. Thiel has remained vigilant in becoming a steadfast contributor to the legacy and incredible history of the Chemical Corps by ensuring those who gave the ultimate sacrifice will never be forgotten. His avocation is now to develop and preserve the histories of the units in which he served in Vietnam.

Dr. Thiel resides in Indiana.

2012

MG Ralph G. Wooten

Major General Ralph G. Wooten

Major General Ralph G. Wooten was born in LaGrange, North Carolina. He graduated from North Carolina Central University in 1966 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology.

After receiving his direct commission from Infantry Officer Candidate School, Major General Wooten’s first assignment was Platoon Leader and Battalion Adjutant, for the 1st Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Republic of Vietnam. Among his assignments were Branch Chief and Deputy Director, Nuclear, Biological, Chemical Training Department, Commander 2nd Chemical Battalion and Commander, U.S. Army Environmental Center. He concluded his 32 year career as the 21st Chief of Chemical, Commanding General U.S. Army Chemical and Police Centers at Fort McClellan, Alabama and Commandant, U.S. Army Chemical School.

Major General Wooten’s Chemical Vision 2010 transformed the Chemical Corps and the ability of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear staffs and units to protect the Joint Force and preserve combat power. Furthermore, he successfully led the relocation of the Chemical and Military Police Schools to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri and the subsequent integration of these schools with the Engineer School to form the U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center.

Major General Wooten’s awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit and the Bronze Star with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters.

COL Merritt W. Briggs

Colonel Merritt W. Briggs

Colonel Merritt W. Briggs was born in Jamestown, New York. He received a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology from Oberlin College, Ohio before entering the service. He entered the army in 1942, was commissioned in 1944 at the Army Chemical Center, Maryland and retired after 26 years in the military. He served during three major conflicts, World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

Colonel Briggs received a Silver Star while he was the Battalion Commander for the 2nd Heavy Chemical Mortar Battalion during the Korean War. He organized and led a tank reconnaissance unit through enemy lines to the overrun mortar positions of two of his companies and then led the mission to recover all usable equipment.

Colonel Briggs also received the Honorary Officer of the Military Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire given by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth I. The award stated: Throughout the campaigns Lieutenant Colonel Briggs’ splendid and most cordial spirit of co-operation with the Commonwealth Division was very noticeable. It was due to his general planning and logistical support that his mortars were always at hand when needed.”

Colonel Briggs received numerous other accolades including a Bronze Star for his outstanding leadership and performance as the Battalion Commander for the 2nd Heavy Chemical Mortar Battalion.

Colonel Briggs passed away 15 April 1988.

2011

1LT Sidney Diamond

First Lieutenant Sidney Diamond

First Lieutenant Sidney Diamond was born to Russian Jewish immigrants in the Bronx, New York. He attended Stuyvesant High School, a school for intellectually gifted boys. Upon graduation, in 1939, he entered City College to study chemical engineering and became a member of the Alpha Phi Omega fraternity.

First Lieutenant Diamond entered into the U.S. Army as a private on 24 April 1942. Upon completion of basic training, he traveled to Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland to join the Chemical Warfare Service (CWS). He would train with Golf Company, 2nd CWS Training Battalion. After completing Officer Candidate School, he was assigned to the 82nd Chemical Battalion, Delta Company as a platoon leader.

The 82nd was attached to the 40th Division, 1st Battalion, 160th Infantry in the Pacific Theater of Operations. On 29 January 1945, acting as a forward observer, First Lieutenant Diamond successfully directed mortar fire during the initial stages of the action, killing and wounding an estimated reinforced platoon of Japanese. In order to bring fire upon other enemy positions, with heroic disregard for his own safety, he made his way alone under intense hostile machine gun, mortar and rifle fire to a position 150 yards beyond friendly lines. Despite continued heavy fire he remained in this position and skillfully directed his mortars in destroying many Japanese troops and strong-points until he was killed by an enemy shell.

First Lieutenant Diamond was awarded the Silver Star for his actions.

2010

LTC Dean M. Dickey

Lieutenant Colonel Dean Monroe Dickey

Dean Monroe Dickey enlisted in the Army in 1939, and by the time America entered WWII he was a master machine gunner. Sergeant Dickey was awarded the Silver Star for his action in defending an aid station on Guadalcanal from a Japanese attack on 14 January 1943.

In 1948, Lieutenant Colonel Dickey received a degree in chemistry and was commissioned in the Chemical Corps. He was assigned as the Chemical Supply Officer, 9710th Technical Escort Unit. After accidental exposure to nerve agent, he returned to the Technical Escort Detachment at Edgewood Arsenal. He was then designated as officer in charge of a 7-man team charged with the mission of clearing an area on Gunpowder Neck of Edgewood Arsenal known as “O” Field. He served as the chemical liaison officer at the U.S. Naval Ordnance Disposal School at Indian Head, Maryland, and later at the Army Material Command in Washington, DC.

In addition to the Silver Star Lieutenant Colonel Dickey’s awards include the Legion of Merit for meritorious service and was commended for having a “profound understanding of the Center’s requirements and ability to communicate these needs to his subordinates” and a commendation from the Secretary of the Army for his work in chemical agent escort and disposal fields.

Following his military retirement, he continued to serve the Nation as a civilian project engineer for the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency.

Lieutenant Colonel Dickey died on 14 November 1979 in Washington, DC.

CPT Paul B. Bowman

Captain Paul Barkley Bowman

Paul Barkley Bowman entered the U.S. Army in 1966 and served in the U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)/Technical Escort Unit at Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland.

In 1969, Captain Bowman was deployed to Vietnam as a Chemical officer with the Chemical Detachment, Headquarter Headquarters Company (HHC), 25th Infantry Division. On 31 January 1970, he was aboard a helicopter that was shot down north of Tay Ninh in an area called “Mo Con Woods.” He was one of three Chemical Corps officers aboard the Huey helicopter dispatched on a mission to provide aerial support for ground forces. The helicopter began making low level runs over the enemy bunker complex, with Captain Bowman arming and dropping clusters of CS riot control agent bomblets, while the crew laid suppressing fire. On one of these passes the aircraft was hit, and crashed into the jungle canopy, killing all seven Soldiers on board; they were from Bravo Company, 25th Aviation Battalion, 25th Infantry Division: CW2 Ronald J. Fulton, pilot; 2LT Michael L. Arrant, copilot; SGT John T. Rodgers, gunner; SGT Jerald D. West, crew chief; and passenger from HHC 25th Infantry Division CPT John L. Beek; CPT Paul B. Bowman, and CPT Jerry David. The efforts of all onboard the helicopter saved the lives of many Soldiers on the ground that day.

Captain Bowman’s awards included the Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal, Parachutist Badge and Senior Explosive Ordnance Disposal Badge.

CSM Theodore R. MacDonnell

Command Sergeant Major Theodore R. MacDonnell

Theodore R. MacDonnell was the son of a WWI British Army veteran and enjoyed dual citizenship in both the U.S. and Great Britain. He was schooled in England, and served as a cadet in a British Border Regiment. An extraordinary athlete, he gained a spot on the 1940 British Olympic decathlon team, but the start of WWII in 1939 prevented his participation. He returned to the U.S. in 1940 and entered the Army in 1942.

In 1943, Private MacDonnell graduated from Ranger training and was selected to become an instructor for the Ranger battalion. He was then recruited for duty in the 91st Chemical Mortar Company. On 21 April 1945, he was acting as a forward observer for his company’s mortars and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions on Okinawa. He reenlisted in the Chemical Warfare Service on 15 March 1946, and was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the Chemical Corps in 1949.

During a reduction in force he left the Army in 1954 and briefly pursued a career in professional baseball and football. He re-enlisted in the Army at the grade of Staff Sergeant. He was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, and would continue serving in the Infantry for the remainder of his career. He earned his combat infantryman’s badge in 1968 during the Tet Offensive in Vietnam. His final assignment was Sergeant Major of the All Army Shooting Team at Fort Benning. Command Sergeant Major Theodore MacDonnell retired from the Army in 1973, after 31 years of service to his nation.

Command Sergeant Major (Retired) MacDonnell passed away in Columbus, Georgia on 25 April 2019.

2009

CSM Peter Hiltner

Command Sergeant Major Peter L. Hiltner

Command Sergeant Major Peter L. Hiltner was born in Freeport, Minnesota. He joined the Minnesota U.S. Army National Guard in 1969, completed One Station Unit Training at the Military Police School at Fort McClellan, Alabama, and then reclassified to the Chemical Corps in 1982.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner served as the 9th Chemical Corps Regimental Command Sergeant Major from 2002 to 2004. Among his other assignments were: CSM 23rd Area Support Group, Pyongtaek, Korea; CSM, 82nd Chemical Battalion, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri; First Sergeant, 4th Chemical Company, Camp Casey, Korea; Course Manager, Technical Escort Course, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama; Nuclear Biological Chemical Noncommissioned Officer, Charlie Company, 82nd Engineer Battalion, Bamberg, Germany. He participated in the defense of Saudi Arabia, the liberation of Kuwait and the Southwest Asia cease-fire campaigns.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner completed the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, the First Sergeants Course, the Battle Staff Course, the Technical Escort Course and the Inspector General’s Course. He graduated with honors and exceeded the course standards of these courses.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner received a bachelor’s degree in police administration from Columbia College and a master’s degree in management from Webster University.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner’s awards include the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal (3OLC), the Army Achievement Medal (6 OLC) and the Humanitarian Service Medal.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner was named the 2nd Honorary Sergeant Major of the Chemical Corps in 2004.

PFC Richard Griffin

Private First Class Richard H. Griffin

Private First Class Richard H. Griffin was born in 1925 and grew up in Asheville, North Carolina. He was active in the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. Richard Griffin and his two brothers were chosen as the poster children for “The Junior Birdmen of America,” and were presented their wings by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Private First Class Griffin volunteered and received permission to join the U.S. Army at the age of seventeen. He was assigned to Bravo Company, 83rd Chemical Mortar Battalion. The 83rd Chemical Mortar Battalion was attached to General George S. Patton’s Seventh Army and saw action in the Sicily, Naples-Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno and Southern France campaigns in support of the 1st, 3rd, and 4th Ranger Battalions among others. During a pivotal battle in the Riquewihr sector, his unit was crucial in securing the entire flank of the division and he made the ultimate sacrifice in service to his bothers-in-arms and his country.

Private First Class Griffin died manning his weapon defending against a numerically superior enemy while surrounded and providing for the escape of his comrades. His actions that fateful day saved the lives of the Soldiers of 2nd Platoon and allowed them time to regroup, counterattack and retake their position, securing the flank once again.

For his noble sacrifice, Private First Class Griffin was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and the Purple Heart with an Oak Leaf Cluster. He also received the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal and the WWII Victory Medal.

2008

COL Stuart A. Hamilton

Colonel Stuart A. Hamilton

Colonel Stuart A. Hamilton transferred to the Chemical Warfare Service (CWS) in 1929. Before WWII, he established the CWS departmental chemical office in the Philippines. During the opening months of the war he oversaw the control of gas warfare planning and chemical supplies and equipment in the Far East Theater.

By February 1942, Colonel Hamilton was assigned as Chief, Chemical Officer, U.S. Army Forces, Far East. Under his supervision, Chemical Soldiers in the besieged Philippines continued to augment American warfighter capabilities on Bataan and Corregidor that significantly impacted both the duration and ferocity of the American defenses. Their program of gathering, evaluating, and forwarding enemy chemical warfare materials also provided a wealth of intelligence that greatly assisted the Allies.

Rather than evacuate from the Philippines, Colonel Hamilton remained at his post and was captured by the Japanese on 7 May 1942. After surviving the “Bataan Death March” he was forced into an internment camp as a Prisoner of War (POW), where he continued to provide leadership to other Chemical Soldiers. He remained a POW until 24 October 1945. The conditions of his captivity, most significantly, malnutrition, left him in ill health and forced his retirement from the U.S. Army in 1947.

Colonel Hamilton was never able to regain his health and later died on 24 July 1956 at age 63.

CPT Frederick Smith

Captain Frederick P. Smith

Captain Frederick P. Smith was the Assistant Division Chemical Officer assigned to Headquarter Company, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), United States Army, Pacific – Republic of Vietnam.

On 13 February 1971, Captain Smith was on a sniffer mission over Binh Thuy Providence using the E158 aerial CS clusters to disrupt enemy operations. Due to an unknown malfunction, the arming wires became loose and the E158s began detonating inside the Huey helicopter. He was badly burned by the black powder bursting charges, but was able to push all of the clusters out of the helicopter. In the confusion and blinded by the CS (commonly referred to as “tear gas”), he went out with the cluster munitions and fell 1,500 feet to his death.

Captain Smith’s quick actions saved the remaining seven crew members and the helicopter. For his selfless actions, he would receive the Silver Star posthumously.

Captain Smith’s courage, dedication, and professionalism are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the United States Army Chemical Corps.

Mr. Garrett Morgan

Mr. Garrett Morgan

Mr. Garrett Morgan was born on 4 March 1877. His parents were former slaves and he worked with his 10 other siblings on the family farm. At the age of 14, he moved to Cleveland, Ohio to seek employment and later became a successful businessman and inventor.

Mr. Morgan’s first patented invention was for a safety hood. This later became known as the Morgan Gas Mask. When a tunnel being constructed under Lake Erie collapsed, he put the mask to the test. Risking injury to himself, he led a rescue team into the collapsed tunnel, pulling suffocating workers and rescuers to safety. He was awarded the Carnegie Medal for Bravery and the Gold Medal for Bravery from the City of Cleveland for his actions.

Mr. Morgan also designed the first three-way traffic signal. It was a T-shaped pole unit featuring three hand cranked positions: stop, go and an all-directional stop position. Its advantage over other types of traffic signals was the ability to operate it from a distance using a mechanical linkage.

In addition to several other awards given to him for his numerous inventions, the Garrett A. Morgan Technology and Transportation Futures Program and the Garrett A. Morgan Cleveland School of Science were established in his honor.

Mr. Morgan died 27 August 1963.

2007

Mr. Michael Parker

Mr. Michael A. Parker

Mr. Michael A. Parker was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his Bachelor of Science from the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy (Missouri University of Science and Technology) and completed graduate work at the University of Michigan and John Hopkins University schools of engineering.

At the time of his induction Mr. Parker was the Director of the U.S. Army Chemical Material Agency. Other key positions were Deputy Commander, U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command; Executive Director, U.S. Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command spearheading the effort to form the Soldier and Biological Command.

Mr. Parker’s awards include the DoD Distinguished Civilian Service Award, Sierra Club Distinguished Achievement Award and Presidential Rank Award.

Mr. Parker has dedicated his career to enhancing the chemical and biological capabilities of the Warfighters and protecting the homeland by eliminating our chemical weapons stockpile. He has distinguished himself throughout his career as a far-sighted leader who transforms vision into innovative accomplishments. He was the driving force behind compliance with the Chemical Warfare Conventions Treaty.

Mr. Parker’s continued support to the Chemical Corps will endure as his legacy.

2006

BG James H. Batte

Brigadier General James H. Batte

Brigadier General James H. Batte was born in Concord North Carolina. He graduated from Davidson College with a Bachelor Degree in chemistry and entered active duty in July 1935 at Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland where he served as a company officer in the 2nd Chemical Mortar Battalion.

Brigadier General Batte moved with his battalion to Europe in March of 1944 landing with the initial assault troops during H-hour of D-Day. During his tenure as Battalion Commander he participated in five campaigns of the European theater. Following the war, he served on the War Department General Staff and from December 1945 until June 1948 was the Executive Aide to the Secretary of the U.S. Army serving concurrent duty as Senior White House Aide to the Truman Administration.

In August of 1965, Brigadier General Batte became the commander of the entire Arsenal complex which included Pine Bluff Arsenal, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Fort Detrick and Edgewood Arsenal.

COL Julian G. Brunt

Colonel Julian G. Brunt

Colonel Julian G. Brunt was born in August of 1920 in Tutwiler, Mississippi. He was assigned to the 87th Chemical Mortar Battalion and in June 1944 participated in the D-Day invasion.

Colonel Brunt earned a battlefield commission in June of 1944 when then Sergeant Brunt received information that his mortar platoon was needed to help combat enemy strong-points. He quickly deployed his platoon into firing position and in a period of one hour and thirty minutes delivered approximately 300 rounds of ammunition into the target area.

Colonel Brunt’s actions on that day also earned him a Bronze Star. Not long afterwards in November of 1944 he earned the Silver Star for gallantry in action when his unit was attacked by a barrage of mortars. One of his Soldiers was wounded and rather than order a medical technician to aid the Soldier, he turned over command to his platoon sergeant and personally treated and evacuated the casualty.

Colonel Brunt went on after the war to serve as Company Commander for the 343rd Chemical Company at Pine Bluff Arsenal. He served dutifully in various positions throughout his career to include Chief of G4 Division, USARPAC, Korea; Commander Support Activity, Germany and Commander of the U.S. Army Chemical School in 1964.

COL Stanley D. Fair

Colonel Stanley D. Fair

Colonel Stanley D. Fair was born and raised in Delphos, Ohio. In 1943, he was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy and later commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Sea Coast Artillery.

Colonel Fair went on to hold the positions of Action Officer, Office of the Chief of Research and Development, Department of the Army; Chemical Officer, Advanced Research Projects Agency, Vietnam; and Chemical, Biological and Radiological Systems Officer at Combat Development Center, Fort Belvoir, Virginia where he was instrumental in a complete review of the Army’s nuclear policy.

In 1966, Colonel Fair was assigned as Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Standardization Representative in Ottawa, Canada. In 1968, he served at the Combat Development Command Institute of Advanced Studies at Carlisle Barracks where he chaired several nuclear studies programs. As Commandant of the Chemical Corps School from 1971 to 1972 at Fort McClellan, he contributed to a revising of the curriculum standards.

Colonel fair was a recognized authority on chemical and nuclear warfare, and authored numerous articles for military journals.

1LT Joseph Terry

First Lieutenant Joseph Terry

First Lieutenant Joseph Terry was born in East Liberty, Pennsylvania in 1917. He entered service in 1942 and was Platoon Leader in the 86th Chemical Mortar Battalion, participating in the D-Day invasion of Normandy. His unit received several unit citation awards for their contribution.

First Lieutenant Terry is one of only 9 members of the Chemical Corps to receive the Distinguished Service Cross during WWII. He received this award due to his action during a prolonged hostile artillery barrage upon his unit in December 1944. A direct hit on an ammunition shed near his Soldier’s barracks detonated white phosphorus and high explosives that set the billets on fire. At great personal risk he ran through the smoke and burning phosphorus to alert the troops. Once to safety he heard a Soldier calling for help and again re-entered the billets and rescued a severely wounded Soldier that was unable to walk.

In all, First Lieutenant Terry saved the lives of six men and showed daring and courage in the face of great danger.

First Lieutenant Terry is also the inventor of the Azimuth Position Finder. Designed to fire mortars more accurately at night, the device was first used successfully in Brest, France, September 10th, 1944 and again successfully for many years thereafter.

2005

GEN Anthony C. McAuliffe

General Anthony Clement McAuliffe

General Anthony Clement McAuliffe was born in Washington, D.C. on July 2, 1898. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy and, in January 1942, was designated Chief of the Ordnance and Coast Artillery Section. In August 1942, he joined the 101st Airborne Division and participated in the allied invasion of Normandy.

In December 1944, during the absence of the Division Commander, General McAuliffe commanded the Division and the attached troops in the defense of Bastogne, Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. When surrounded by the German Army and given an ultimatum to surrender, he responded with a single word answer, “NUTS.” He would receive the Distinguished Service Cross from General Patton “For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy,” for his leadership during the epic stand at Bastogne.

In 1946, General McAuliffe served at Bikini during the testing of atomic bombs. He then became Army Secretary of the Joint Research and Development Board. In 1947, he was designated Deputy Director for Research and Development of the Logistics Division. He was appointed Chief of the Chemical Corps, 1949-1951. As Chief of Chemical, he reactivated Dugway Proving Grounds and because he felt it was a safe area to test weapons it was expanded by 279,000 acres. General McAuliffe was also the first Chief of Chemical to address the American Chemical Society. In December 1954, he was named Commanding General, United States Army in Europe.

General McAuliffe retired on 31 May 1956 and passed away 11 August 1975.

Dr. Irving Langmuir

Dr. Irving Langmuir

Dr. Irving Langmuir was born January 31st, in Brooklyn, New York. He received his Bachelor of Science from Columbia University in Metallurgical Engineering and his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Gottingen, Germany.

Dr. Langmuir worked for General Electric Company for 41 years, staying active as a consultant after his retirement. He was a physical chemist whose studies of molecular films on solid and liquid surfaces opened new fields in colloid research and biochemistry. During WWI, he helped to develop listening devices for detecting submarines.

In 1932, Dr. Langmuir would receive the Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for his discoveries and investigations in surface chemistry.” In 1940, The National Defense Research Committee established a project on smokes and filters. He worked on this project by studying the size and color of particles in artificial fogs to determine maximum screening ability. He learned that the effect of a smoke screen on the eye was partly physiological, party optical and partly psychological. This led to the development of the M1 Mechanical Smoke Generator which saw extensive use during the Anzio Campaign to screen U.S. troops from hostile artillery fire.

After the war, Dr. Langmuir worked on weather control and icing problems of airplanes. His work at General Electric included improved vacuum techniques, gas filled lamps, the atomic hydrogen torch and many other discoveries.

Dr. Langmuir passed away on August 16th, 1957.

Mr. James L. Bacon

Mr. James L. Bacon

Mr. James L. Bacon was born December 17th in Camden, Arkansas. He has a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and a Master of Science in Engineering. He started his career as a mechanical engineer at Pine Bluff Arsenal, AR.

In 1971, Mr. Bacon became the Special Assistant to the Technical Director of the U.S. Army’s Chemical Research and Development and Engineering Center at Edgewood Arsenal, MD. He would serve as General Engineer, U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD and as Project Engineer for the Honest John GB Warhead Demilitarization Program at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, CO.

In 1996 Mr. Bacon was promoted to Executive Assistant to the Commander of Pine Bluff Arsenal. Through his efforts, great strides were made in public safety, environmental improvements and treaties on Chemical Demilitarization. He was then appointed as a Member of the Senior Executive Service at Aberdeen Proving Ground and then as Program Manager for Chemical Demilitarization until his retirement in 2002.

Mr. Bacon was a two time recipient of the prestigious Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his support to the Army’s Binary Chemical Munitions Program and for his expertise in handling chemical incidents, dedication and hard work in the Spring Valley project.

Mr. Bacon is a leading expert in chemical matters, an exemplary corporate citizen and a prominent community leader. His 41 years of devotion to Federal Service has positively impacted the U.S. Army and the Chemical Corps.

2004

CPT James Panas

Captain James P. Panas

Captain James P. Panas’ heroic acts on the beaches of Normandy exemplified the motto “Protect the Force” and his dedication and calm under enemy fire reflect the spirit of the Dragon. One of only 9 Distinguished Service Cross recipients from the Chemical Corps in WWII, his actions are a model for all present and future Dragon Soldiers.

During the thrust across France and Belgium Captain Panas and two Soldiers under his command encountered enemy troops in the town of Vresse. The group managed to maneuver out of the town, returning the enemy fire as they did so, only to find two enemy tanks blacking the road ahead.

Captain Panas ordered the two Soldiers to abandon the vehicle and disperse into the woods, which they did. He remained behind and covered the escape of his men, but it cost him his life. The next day when his body was found the Belgians had placed it in a position of honor and brought floral tributes for this truly brave man.

Captain Panas’ decorations also include the Bronze Star medal and the Purple Heart.

2003

MG George E. Friel

Biography Photo

Biography

COL Jack Mojecki

Biography Photo

Biography

MAJ Herbert W. Thornton

Biography Photo

Biography

SGM Paul D. Cockman, Jr.

Biography Photo

Biography

Dr. Anna Johnson-Winegar

Biography Photo

Biography

2001

MG Peter G. Olenchuk

Biography Photo

Biography

MG Robert D. Orton

Biography Photo

Biography

BG Peter Hidalgo

Biography Photo

Biography

LTC Charles Kirkwood

Biography Photo

Biography

1999

COL George B. Coe

Biography Photo

Biography

LTC Troy H. Sanders

Biography Photo

Biography

PVT Edward C. Carter

Biography Photo

Biography

1997

GEN John Pershing

Biography Photo

Biography

COL Walton A. Phillips

Biography Photo

Biography

SGM Donald E. Brinkley

Biography Photo

Biography

Mr. Thomas F. Carroll

Biography Photo

Biography

1996

BG Fred Joseph Delmore

Biography Photo

Biography

Mr. Michell Modrall

Biography Photo

Biography

1995

MG Alan A. Nord

Biography Photo

Biography

COL Carl V. Burke

Biography Photo

Biography

COL George P. Unmacht

Biography Photo

Biography

Mr. Randolph Monro

Biography Photo

Biography

1994

MG James R. Klugh

Biography Photo

Biography

MG Gerald G. Watson

Biography Photo

Biography

COL Billy G. Cook

Biography Photo

Biography

CSM George L. Murray

Biography Photo

Biography

1993

MG David W. Einsel, Jr.

Major General David W. Einsel, Jr.

Major General David W. Einsel, Jr. was born in Tiffin, Ohio on 4 November 1928. His civilian education included a Bachelor of Arts in chemistry and a Master of Arts in physical chemistry from Ohio State University, as well as a Master of Science in physics from the University of Virginia.

He has devoted over 40 years of service to the nation during which time he had a great impact on all aspects of the nation’s NBBC offensive and defensive capabilities. He concluded his active duty service as Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense from 1980 to 1985.

He then served from 1985 to 1989 as National Intelligence Officer at Large with the Central Intelligence Agency, studying the proliferation of chemical and nuclear weapons. Since 1989 he has served as a consultant on NBC matters to the Director of Central Intelligence.

Major General Einsel and his wife, Elva, reside in Tiffin, Ohio.

COL Edwin M. Chance

Colonel Edwin M. Chance

Colonel Edwin M. Chance received his Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania in 1907. He began his military career in 1917 at Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland.

His first task was construction of the first toxic gas filling plant in the United States. He reviewed French plans for a similar plant and found them both inefficient and unsafe. Using technology from the American bottling industry, Colonel Chance then developed plans that became the standard at Edgewood Arsenal.

He later played a key role in establishing the toxic gas production plant at Edgewood, firmly believing that it would be more efficient to have such a plant near the filling facility rather than at private industrial sites. After the war, Colonel Chance had a long and distinguished career in private industry.

Colonel Chance died on 26 November 1954.

COL Garland M. White

Colonel Garland M. White

Colonel Garland M. White began his military service as an enlisted man in the National Guard in 1913. Commissioned in 1924, he transferred to the Chemical Warfare Service in 1942.

In February 1945 he assumed command of the new Guard and Security Division established to manage disposal of chemical agents. After the war this organization managed the disposition of captured German chemical agents. As there was no existing emergency medical kit for nerve agent exposure, Colonel White and an Army medical officer developed a first aid kit using atropine.

In 1947 the Guard and Security Detachment was redesignated the Technical Escort Detachment. Under his direction the unit established methods for handling chemical munitions and developed several special tools for this purpose. The hundreds of men he trained provided the Army with the critical special skills necessary for safe transport and disposal of chemical agents.

Mrs. Elsie W. Fisher

Mrs. Elsie W. Fisher

Mrs. Elsie W. Fisher began her service with the Army at the lowest civilian grade shortly before the beginning of World War II. Early in her career she moved to the office of the Chief of the Chemical Warfare Service where she served as a key administrative staff member through many successive reorganizations until her retirement in 1987 as a GS-9. By the mid-1960s she had become the top administrative member on the staff of the senior Chemical Officer at Headquarters, Department of the Army.

Mrs. Fisher was a superb trainer of the Chemical Officers who served in the Pentagon, many of whom later reached general officer rank, often attributing their success to her influence.

She became the “institutional memory” of the Chemical Corps, preserving key records through reorganizations and attempts to abolish the Corps. These were invaluable to the revitalization of the Corps in the late 1970s and 1980s.

1992

COL Joaquin E. Zanetti

Colonel Joaquin Enrique Zanetti

Colonel Joaquin Enrique Zanetti was born in the Dominican Republic on January 20th, 1885. He received his PhD in chemistry from Harvard University in 1909 and then began a distinguished teaching career at Columbia University leading to his appointment as full professor in 1929 and professor emeritus in 1953.

During World War I he was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Chemical Warfare Service. In the interwar years he served as a Chemical Officer in the reserves and was a consulting expert for the League of Nations on chemical warfare.

A pioneer in incendiary warfare in the 1930s, he was called to active duty in 1941 to take charge of the critically important incendiary bomb program.

Colonel Zanetti’s numerous awards include the Order of the British Empire, the French Legion of Honor, and the U.S. Distinguished Service Medal.

Colonel Zanetti died on January 26, 1974.

Mr. Edwin R. Bradley

Mr. Edward R. Bradley

Mr. Edward R. Bradley was born in Greeneville, Texas, on March 4, 1931. He received his Bachelor of Science in physics in 1958, followed by his Master of Science from East Texas University in 1960.

He then joined the Chemical School as Chief of the Radiology Laboratory, a position he held at Fort McClellan, Alabama, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, then again at Fort McClellan, until his untimely death in 1982.

Mr. Bradley established and conducted a nationally recognized radiological safety and radiological defense program which incorporated the first simulated nuclear fallout field using controllable radiological sources. His superb instruction had a positive influence on countless students over a long career, in which he came to be recognized by students, peers, and superiors as the “N” in NBC.

Ms. Amoretta M. Hoeber

Ms. Amoretta M. Hoeber

Ms. Amoretta M. Hoeber was born in Austin, Texas, on November 14, 1941. After receiving her AB in political science from Stanford University she did graduate work in mathematics and operations research there, at UCLA and American University.

Ms. Hoeber has written widely on chemical and nuclear warfare and has been a consistent and staunch supporter of the Chemical Corps. She has held a number of senior positions including Presidential appointments in the Department of the Army from 1981 to 1986.

Ms. Hoeber was a key spokesperson for the Army in obtaining approval from Congress for the chemical binary munitions program. She also orchestrated the billion dollar program for the destruction of obsolete chemical weapons.

Ms. Hoeber holds the Department of Army Decoration for Distinguished Civilian Service which she received in September 1986.

1991

MG William Marshall Stubbs

Major General W. Marshall Stubbs

Major General W. Marshall Stubbs was born in Nebraska in 1906. After graduating from the United States Military academy in 1929, he served with the Infantry for four years, transferring to the Chemical Warfare Service in 1934.

He served as a senior Chemical Officer in the European Theater during World War II. After the war he commanded the Chemical Corps Materiel Command and the 1st Logistical Command.

His distinguished service with the Chemical Corps culminated with his assignment as Chief Chemical Officer from 1958 to 1963. Major General Stubbs many decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Ordre de Leopold with Palm from Belgium and Croix de Guerre with Palm from France.

Major General Stubbs died 20 November 1990.

BG A.M. Prentiss

Brigadier General Augustin M. Prentiss

Brigadier General Augustin M. Prentiss was born in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 1890. He received his Bachelor of Science from the George Washington University in 1911 and then served with the Chemical Warfare Service in France during World War I.

He remained in the Chemical Warfare Service after the war and received his PhD from the George Washington University in 1923. His assignments after then included that of Technical Director of Edgewood Arsenal and command of Pine Bluff Arsenal throughout World War II.

Brigadier General Prentiss authored many books and articles, including Chemicals in War; A Treatise on Chemical Warfare, still widely consulted.

His many decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the U.S. Legion of Honor and the French Legion of Honor.

COL William H. Walker

Colonel William H. Walker

Colonel William H. Walker was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1869. He received his Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Pennsylvania State College in 1890 and a PhD from the University of Gottingen in 1892.

A professor of chemical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology before World War I, his expertise led to his appointment as first Assistant Director of the War Department Gas Service, forerunner of the Chemical Warfare Service, in 1916.

He later directed research in Chemical Warfare at American University and became the first commander of Edgewood Arsenal. After the war, Colonel Walker returned to teaching but maintained a keen interest in the Chemical Warfare Service until his death on 9 July 1934.

Colonel Walker’s numerous awards include the Distinguished Service Medal and the American Chemical Society Nichols Gold Medal.

CPL Robert B. MacMullin

Corporal Robert B. MacMullin

Corporal Robert Burns MacMullin was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1898. He served with the First Gas Regiment in France during World War I and was an ardent supporter of the Chemical Warfare Service and Chemical Corps.

He was active in the First Gas Regiment Association and was editor of their newsletter the “Gas Attack” for many years. After World War I, Corporal MacMullin received a degree in chemical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and went on to a distinguished career in chemical engineering.

Corporal MacMullin holds over 50 patents, he published widely in professional journals and he authored chapters in several textbooks and encyclopedias.

Among his awards are the 1982 Award for Chemical Engineering Practice from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Schoellkopf Medal and the Perkin Medal.

Dr. Bernard Berger

Dr. Bernard Berger

Dr. Bernard Berger retired from the position of Director of Weapons Systems at the United States Army Chemical Research and Development Laboratories in 1980 after over 37 years of service to the Chemical Corps.

During his distinguished career he contributed to numerous chemical warfare developments and authored a large number of technical and scientific articles published by national laboratories and professional journals. Because of his reputation he was selected to represent the United States in the NATO Group on Defense against Chemical Warfare. He also chaired the Tripartite Flame Conference and actively participated in the French-American Defense Technical Cooperation Exchange Program.

Dr. Berger’s numerous awards included the William H. Walker award, the Legion d’Honneur from the French Government, two Meritorious Civilian Service Medals and the Commendation for Meritorious Civilian Service during World War II.

Dr. Berger died 23 February 1981.

1990

MG John G. Appel

Major General John G. Appel

Major General John G. Appel graduated from Rose Polytechnic Institute, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, in 1941 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering. He received a commission as Second Lieutenant in the Chemical Warfare Service Reserve and entered active duty on 7 July 1941.

Among his assignments were Commanding Officer of the U.S. Army Chemical Procurement District in New York City; Chief, Plans and Policy Division, CBR and Nuclear Operations Directorate, and then the Deputy Director, CBR and Nuclear Operations Directorate in the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff; Director of Plans, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics at the Pentagon; Senior Serving Chemical Officer (1972-1974) and Director of Logistics, J-4 in Germany at the Headquarters, U.S. European Command.

His awards include: The Legion of Merit (2 Oak leaf clusters), the Army Commendation Medal with one oak leaf cluster.

MG Egbert F. Bullene

Major General Egbert F. Bullene

Major General Egbert F. Bullene entered the Army in 1917 after graduation from the Naval Academy. He served as an artillery officer in France in World War I and subsequently joined the Chemical Warfare Service.

During World War II he was promoted to Brigadier General and served as Commander of the Chemical Troops Training Center, Chemical Officer for the Armored Forces, and Commanding General of the San Jose project.

He also served in both the European and Pacific theaters of operation. After the war he commanded the Army Chemical Center and served as the Chief Chemical Officer of the Army. Major General Bullene’s decorations included the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star Medal, and the Purple Heart.

Major General Bullene died on 21 February 1958.

MG William N. Porter

Major General William N. Porter

Major General William N. Porter graduated from the Naval Academy in 1909. He served with the Navy and the Army Coast Artillery Corps and then transferred to the Chemical Warfare Service 1921.

Shortly before Pearl Harbor, Major General Porter became Chief of the Chemical Warfare Service, a position he held throughout the war. Under his leadership, the Army’s chemical defensive and offensive capabilities deterred use of chemical weapons by the Axis Powers.

The Chemical Warfare Service also made significant contributions to victory through the use of the 4.2 inch chemical mortar with smoke, incendiary bombs and high explosives and mechanized flame throwers. After retirement in 1945, Major General Porter held important positions with industry.

Among his many awards were the Distinguished Service Medal, the Order of Leopold from the Belgian Government, and Award of Commander, Order of the British Empire.

Major General Porter died in Key West, Florida, in February 1973.

COL Lewis M. McBride

Colonel Lewis M. McBride

Colonel Lewis M. McBride was born in Iowa in 1879. After service with the Colorado National Guard, he was commissioned as a Captain in the Corps of Engineers in 1918. In 1920 he transferred to the Chemical Warfare Service where he served until his retirement in 1944.

Colonel McBride, the “Father of the 4.2” mortar,” experimented successfully with new methods of filling and sealing liquids in shells. He held several patents, but his greatest contribution was the 4.2 inch mortar. He successfully rifled the 4 inch Stokes mortar to increase range and accuracy. The new mortar was to play a key role in World War II and Korea.

Colonel McBride retired twice from the Army. The first time was in 1942. This retirement was short lived as he was recalled to active duty shortly thereafter, serving with distinction until his permanent retirement in 1944.

Colonel McBride died June 1956.

Dr. Bernard P. McNamara

Dr. Bernard P. McNamara

Dr. Bernard P. McNamara devoted a professional career of almost 40 years to the Chemical Corps. Beginning as a junior pharmacologist at Edgewood Arsenal in 1942, he culminated his career in the senior executive service as Chief of the Toxicology Division at the Chemical Research and Development Laboratories.

A pioneer in his field, Dr. McNamara wrote over 150 technical publications. In addition to his work with the Army, he was an advisor to the Environmental Protection Agency and a very active participant in professional activities. His vast expertise led to service on the Committee on Disarmament, the National Research Council, and the National Cancer Institute.

His numerous awards included the William H. Walker Award, the Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award, and the National Civil Service League Career Service Award.

Dr. McNamara died in 1980.

1989

MG William N. Creasy

Major General William N. Creasy

Major General William N. Creasy served as the Chief of Chemical Officer and Commanding General of the Army Chemical Center from 1951 until 1958. During this service, he directed the U.S. Army’s development of a modernized chemical warfare capability through nerve agent standardization and new production methods and facilities.

Major General Creasy faced serious threats to disestablish the Chemical Corps since chemical weapons had not been used in the last two wars and because of increasing popular distaste for chemical warfare. As he successfully defended the Chemical Corps, he not only modernized its offensive and defensive capabilities, but he also modernized its research and management.

He strengthened the bond between the civilian industrial base and the Corps, streamlined its command structure, and implemented progressive means of production, research, and training.

MG Amos A. Fries

Major General Amos A. Fries

Major General Amos A. Fries served as the first chief of the Gas Service, American Expeditionary Force in World War I, from September 1917 until the Armistice in November 1918. Then Colonel Fries was responsible for organizing, equipping, and training the major overseas command of the American chemical warfare effort.

After the Armistice, Major General Fries was instrumental in establishing the Chemical Warfare Service (CWS) as a permanent part of the Regular Army in 1920. He then became its second chief and served there for the next nine years.

Major General Fries faced and overcame serious attempts to abolish the combat mission of the CWS because of the growing distaste for chemical warfare and the natural reduction of the Army to its peacetime level. His tireless work set the pattern for the future of the CWS and assured its place in the United States Army.

MG John J. Hayes

Major General John J. Hayes

Major General John J. Hayes, as commander of the Second Logistics Command, planned and executed Operation Red Hat, the flawless movement of more than 10,000 tons of toxic chemical munitions from Okinawa to Johnston Island in 1970 and 1971.

He was personally responsible for the extremely sensitive planning and coordination of the movement from Okinawa and for the identification and preparation of another storage site. The movement required construction of storage facilities on Johnston Island, identifying numerous routes for the movement, training personnel, and coordinating among the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard, and civilian agencies.

His understanding of and concern for the political and public issues enabled him to solve countless problems arising from adverse public opinion and often heated national opposition.

MG William L. Sibert

Major General William L. Sibert

Major General William L. Sibert was the first Chief of the Chemical Warfare Service (CWS) from 1918 until 1920. In June of 1918, he brought his extensive experience in organizing and conducting complex engineering projects to bear on the chaotic American effort in gas warfare.

He consolidated the work of the Medical, Ordnance, Signal and Engineer Corps and the U.S. Bureau of Mines into one agency. The result, the CWS, had an authorized strength of 4,060 officers and 44,615 enlisted men.

Major General Sibert directed the total American effort in research and development in chemical munitions and in the standardization of doctrine, materiel, and training. His effort welded together the great U.S. Chemical Warfare Machine, ensured unity of effort, and brought the CWS to maturity as a permanent, separate branch of the United States Army.

COL Earl J. Atkisson

Colonel Earl J. Atkisson

Colonel Earl J. Atkisson organized, trained, and commanded the First Gas Regiment from August 1917 until March 1919. As a captain, Atkisson was tasked to raise the 30th Engineer Regiment (Gas and Flame). In ten months he recruited all officers and enlisted men, equipped and trained the Regiment, and deployed to France.

In August of 1918, the 30th Engineers was redesignated the First Gas Regiment of the American Gas Service. In spite of Allied experience in the First World War, Colonel Atkisson had to first convince skeptical American field commanders of the value of offensive gas operations.

He was so effective that eventually, in a five month period (17 July to 11 November 1918), the Regiment participated in 133 separate actions using poison gases, smoke, and high explosives.

For his exceptional command, Colonel Atkisson was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOF

(Alphabetical Order)

CSM Patrick Z. Alston (2019)

MG John G. Appel (1990)

COL Earl J. Atkisson (1989)

Mr. James L. Bacon (2005)

CPT Andrew M. Barr (2014)

BG James H. Batte (2006)

Dr. Bernard Berger (1991)

CPT Paul B. Bowman (2010)

Mr. Edwin R. Bradley (1992)

COL Merritt W. Briggs (2012)

• SGM Donald E. Brinkley (1997)

COL Julian G. Brunt (2006)

MG Egbert F. Bullene (1990)

• COL Carl V. Burke (1995)

• Mr. Thomas F. Carroll (1997)

• PVT Edward C. Carter (1999)

COL Edwin M. Chance (1993)

• SGM Paul D. Cockman, Jr. (2003)

• COL George B. Coe (1999)

• COL Billy G. Cook (1994)

MG William N. Creasy (1989)

LTC William J. Cribb, Jr. (2016)

• BG Fred Joseph Delmore (1996)

1LT Sidney Diamond (2011)

LTC Dean M. Dickey (2010)

MG John C. Doesburg (2015)

MG David W. Einsel, Jr. (1993)

COL Stanley D. Fair (2006)

Mrs. Elsie W. Fisher (1993)

• MG George E. Friel (2003)

MG Amos A. Fries (1989)

PFC Richard Griffin (2009)

COL Stuart A. Hamilton (2008)

MG John J. Hayes (1989)

• BG Peter Hidalgo (2001)

CSM Peter Hiltner (2009)

Ms. Amoretta M. Hoeber (1992)

• Dr. Anna Johnson-Winegar (2003)

COL Harold C. Kinne, Jr. (2016)

• LTC Charles Kirkwood (2001)

• MG James R. Klugh (1994)

Dr. Irving Langmuir (2005)

1LT Andre N. Laus (2017)

BG Stanley H. Lillie (2014)

CSM Theodore R. MacDonnell (2010)

CPL Robert B. MacMullin (1991)

GEN Anthony C. McAuliffe (2005)

COL Lewis M. McBride (1990)

PVT Donald B. McLaren (2018)

Dr. Bernard P. McNamara (1990)

• Mr. Michell Modrall (1996)

• COL Jack Mojecki (2003)

• Mr. Randolph Monro (1995)

Mr. Garrett Morgan (2008)

• CSM George L. Murray (1994)

SGT Raymond E. Nicoli (2018)

BG Patricia L. Nilo (2014)

• MG Alan A. Nord (1995)

• MG Peter G. Olenchuk (2001)

• MG Robert D. Orton (2001)

CPT James Panas (2004)

Mr. Michael Parker (2007)

• GEN John Pershing (1997)

• COL Walton A. Phillips (1997)

MG William N. Porter (1990)

PVT Benton L. Porter (2018)

BG A.M. Prentiss (1991)

MG Stephen V. Reeves (2013)

• LTC Troy H. Sanders (1999)

Tech 5 Felice J. Savino (2018)

MG William L. Sibert (1989)

CPT Frederick Smith (2008)

LTG Thomas W. Spoehr (2019)

LTC Edgar D. Stark (2015)

MG William Marshall Stubbs (1991)

1LT Joseph Terry (2006)

SSG Dr. John E. Thiel (2013)

• MAJ Herbert W. Thornton (2003)
COL Harry D. Tyson (2020)

• COL George P. Unmacht (1995)

COL William H. Walker (1991)

• MG Gerald G. Watson (1994)

COL Garland M. White (1993)

MG Ralph G. Wooten (2012)

COL Joaquin E. Zanetti (1992)