Spc. Aaliyah Craven
3rd DSB

Photo by Spc. Aaliyah Craven

Col. Harry (Chip) Huey, the chaplain for Fort Stewart and Hunter Army Airfield Garrison, briefs chaplains and religious affairs specialists from the 3rd Infantry Division. April 1 during a staff ride at Fort Frederica National Monument on St. Simons Island. The staff ride focused on establishing dif­ferent historical perspectives of spirituality, by discussing John Wesley, a chaplain from Epworth, England, who sailed to Georgia, with his brother, in 1735, set on carrying the gospel to new land.

Chaplains embrace the past to prepare for a better future

Chaplains and religious affairs specialists from across 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart and Hunter Army Airfield attended a staff ride, April 1 at Fort Frederica National Monument on St. Simons Island. The staff ride focused on estab­lishing different historical perspectives of spiri­tuality by discussing John Wesley, a chaplain from Epworth, England, who sailed to Georgia with his brother in 1735, set on carrying the gospel to the new land.

The staff ride gave a chance for chaplains and religious affairs specialists to physically walk the grounds and be involved in the learning experi­ence.

“The Wesley brothers were here to provide soul care and that doesn’t change for today,” said Col. Chip Huey, the chaplain for Fort Stewart-Hunter Army Airfield Garrison. “Chaplains and religious affairs specialists are tasked with the purpose of providing soul care for Soldiers and their Families.”

The group discussed Wesley’s missions before, during and after he left Georgia, focusing on his strict and unyielding methods of living that at the time held little value to the Native Americans and colonists.

An overall point made was how it’s important for chaplains and religious affairs specialists to stay flexible and recognize that there are different ways to handle situations.

“When you enter new situations you must learn to adapt and be flexible,” said Sgt. Eric Jackson II, 3rd Division Sustainment Brigade religious affairs noncommissioned officer. “Not only in the unit or area that you go into, but also the Soldiers that you work with.”

Looking into the past can aid chaplains and religious affairs on their journeys of taking care of Soldiers’ mental and religious health.

“The Army leaders want to build a healthy cul­ture and community within the Army and the chaplains can help do that by focusing on just the spiritual pillar of a service member’s life,” said Lt. Col. Chris Wallace, the 3rd Infantry Division chap­lain.

Having staff rides allows Soldiers to analyze the past and avoid repeating errors in the future, while networking with others in their job field.

“People don’t change and the human condition doesn’t change,” said Huey. “The importance of being able to understand the past and apply it in the present enables you to prepare successfully for the future.”