Sgt. Laurissa Hodges
3rd DSB PAO
Courtesy photo
Soldiers assigned to Alpha Company, 87th Division Sustainment Support Battalion, 3rd Division Sustainment Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, conduct a combat lifesaver course on Fort Stewart, Georgia, Oct. 4-7. The course is the bridge between the basic lifesaving skills that Soldiers receive during basic training and the more intensive training taught to combat medics, so Soldiers can treat casualties prior to the medic’s arrival.

Alpha Company attends Combat Lifesaver Course

Soldiers assigned to Alpha Company, 87th Division Sustainment Support Battalion, 3rd Division Sustainment Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, conduct combat lifesaver course on Fort Stewart, Oct. 4-7.

The course is the bridge between the basic lifesaving skills that Soldiers receive during basic training and the more intensive training taught to combat medics, so Soldiers can treat casualties prior to the medic’s arrival

“Currently, A Co. is on prepare-to-deploy orders, so our Soldiers are taking the class to increase their first aid skills past the initial tactical combat casualty care training that all Soldiers are required to receive,” said 1st Lt. Tyler Tiedemann, the company executive officer. “This training prepares Soldiers to use equipment in CLS aid bags and better respond to life threatening injuries.”

Certifying the Soldiers for CLS helps future missions by maintaining readiness. According to the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School Department of Combat Medic Training, about 90% of combat deaths occur on the battlefield. Proper use of self-aid, buddy aid and combat lifesaver skills can reduce battlefield deaths by 15% to 18%.

“CLS Soldiers provide medical coverage for live fire ranges and field training when in garrison by helping to asses and treat any injuries that may occur during training,” Tiedemann. “In a deployed environment, they act as first responders for any injuries that may occur by working to triage and stabilize injured Soldiers and allowing leaders to make better judgement calls when dealing with [casualty evacuation] and [medical evaluation] operations. These efforts significantly improve the chance of survival for all Soldiers within the unit.”

Combat medics can only treat one individual at a time, treating the most severely injured first. If there are multiple casualties, or the medic is injured, CLS-trained personnel are instrumental in potentially saving lives.

“It’s important so that Soldiers down range can understand how to take care of their battle buddies,” said Sgt. Luis Arbelaez, a combat medic specialist assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Division Special Troops Battalion, 3rd DSB. “I hope the Soldiers understand more about anatomy, how the body works, and how to treat wounds in a combat environment after taking this class.”

The course is designed around the three stages of Tactical Combat Casualty Care: Care Under Fire, Tactical Field Care, and Casualty Evacuation Care, followed by an exam to test the knowledge and skills learned. Another benefit of the CLS course is the confidence the Soldiers build to potentially stop life-threatening wounds.

“This course is very important so we can act accordingly and save our lives or those around us,” said Spc. Ana Ramos, a petroleum supply specialist assigned to A Co. “Hopefully I won’t have to apply my skills anytime soon, but if the situation arises I’m confident in my capabilities.”