Sgt. Daniel Guerrero

PAO, 1ABCT

Photo by Sgt. Daniel Guerrero

Sgt. Tevin Sumler with Battery C, 1-41 FA, 1ABCT, 3rd ID, uses hand signals to help align equipment, June 20 to recreate a photo depicting the 3rd ID patch, taken more than 100 years ago.

3rd Infantry Division Artillery Soldiers re-create history

Artillery Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 41st Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division re-created a historic photo dating back to the first world war at Fort Stewart, June 20.

The original photo shows artillery Soldiers from the 3rd Field Artillery Brigade, 3rd ID, standing in a formation that resembles the 3rd ID patch with all of the unit’s canons in its arsenal. The photo captured an invaluable moment on German soil more than a century, and cemented their significance in history.

The Soldiers of 1-41FA, along with their counter parts from the 3rd ID Artillery, and the 1st Battalion, 9th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd ID, reproduced that moment in time by generating a resembling photograph in honor of the Soldiers who served before them.

Re-creating historic photos not only keeps traditions alive and honors past Soldiers, it can also show how much progress we have made.

“Recreating this picture that was taken 100 years ago shows how far the field artillery has advanced in both weapon systems and technology,” says Staff Sgt. Juan Posadas, a gunnery sergeant with 1-41FA.

Although we can see the advancements in the equipment by comparing the old photo with the new one, Posadas believes the spirit of artillery Soldiers is still the same.

“Being an artillery Soldier takes a certain kind of person and looking at this photo, I can see that those Soldiers took pride in their craft just like we do today,” said Posadas. “I love my job wouldn’t want to be doing anything else.”

Sgt. 1st Class Hector Ramos, the battalion operations sergeant of 1-41FA, believes it is very important to keep traditions alive and honor the brave Soldiers who came before them.

“100 years is a very long time, and to keep this tradition means everything as a show of respect to those artillerymen, also known as Red Legs, of the past,” says Ramos. “We need to remember those who came before us and all they did for us, this why we are the greatest Army in the world.”

Ramos believes it is important that we remember traditions like this not only to honor past Soldiers but to also learn from our history and build on our experiences.

The new photo will serve as a reminder to keep the long legacy of all artillery Soldiers alive for many years to come.